Climate · Culture · growth mindset · innovation · Innovator's Mindset · leadership · Mandy Froehlich · PLN · professional development · reflections

The Ability to Change: It’s not about the technology

Today, I was at a Technology Director’s meeting. I know it may not sound riveting exactly, but it is one of the best cross-district meetings I attend. Basically, we get a bunch of super smart, incredibly kind and collaborative people in a room and we attempt to solve the world’s problems. My favorite part? This particular group begins almost every answer to a tech question with a focus on learning instead of tech. It makes my heart happy.

At one point, the question was raised regarding strategies for helping people deal with the constant technology changes both within schools and the growth of technology in general. I had spent a great deal of time last year and over the summer thinking about this and reaching out to my PLN to bounce ideas off of them, and what I came up with was a little bit of what we have been implementing at the beginning of this year, and it is also where I have seen the most changes in some of the teachers I work with. What I have noticed over the last few years of working with people and technology is that the ones that are the readiest for change have certain characteristics in common, and there are things that districts can do to help support teachers and admin in these areas. The part in all this that I think is the most interesting is that we are trying to get people comfortable with technology change, but it is not about the technology at all. It is about their ability to accept change in general. We are focusing on the wrong aspect of technology change if it is the technology we are concentrating on.

These characteristics are as follows:

Mindset

It’s more than Growth Mindset. Most likely Innovator’s Mindset. Maybe there’s even one step further…a Teacher’s Mindset. Knowing that change is inevitable and will continue to happen whether they accept it or not because our students are constantly changing, their needs are changing, their experience in the world is constantly changing. It doesn’t mean they like every change that comes down the pipe, but they pick their battles based off from what they feel is not good for students. They are also naturally reflective people (which, to me, is part of mindset), and their reflection goes beyond wondering if the lesson went well. They will also ask:

“Were my students engaged? Empowered?”
“Did each student get what they needed when they needed it?”
“Is there anything more I can do to support them? Help them enjoy their learning?”
“Are my expectations high enough?”

These questions don’t change much for an administrator. If you exchange “student” for “teacher”, they are actually identical.

Adaptability

People who are able to accept change are adaptable. We tell students that part of their career readiness skills is adaptability, but it is difficult to actually teach adaptability in a world where procedures and policies keep people safe (sane) and give us some controlled chaos. Through raising four of my own kids and being a teacher, I realized that kids actually LIKE structure. They like to know what is going to happen, and it makes them feel safe if they know what is expected. The same goes for when we become adults. Nothing will make a teacher more upset quicker than a new initiative that they haven’t been trained on because they don’t know what to expect or how to begin.

Anything that would work on our adaptability skills will take us out of our comfort zone. So, for some people, unless they have been regularly forced outside their comfort zone either by their own choice or by some sort of adversity, might not develop the skills to adjust to new conditions or environment as well as others. I believe that people can develop and work on their adaptability skills by pushing themselves to learn outside their comfort zones. Focusing on adaptability as a skill that we want teachers and admin to develop is the first step. Asking them to self-reflect on their skills would be the second, and then regular nudges to step outside their comfort zone, and supporting them when they do it, would be the next. This might actually be learning about and integrating technology into their classrooms, but the adaptability will come as they become more comfortable with being uncomfortable.

Professional Engagement

This might be one of the issues I’ve been noticing the most lately, and I only figured out it was a thing years ago after I had been disengaged, then subsequently re-engaged, from mine.

I was reading the School Leaders Dunk Tank by Rick Jetter and Rebecca Coda, and it discussed how people can become adversarial when they feel like they feel like they have not been supported and, therefore, develop feelings of hurt. The hurt turns into resentment, and that resentment infiltrates many other parts of their professional life. You could easily replace adversarial with disengaged. Disengaged professionals begin to dislike their jobs because they feel like they are no longer making a difference. They think that kids begin to do things to them “on purpose” just to irritate them, or they take new district initiatives as personal vendettas. But, they absolutely worst part of no longer being engaged is that they forget that they are there for students, and the difference they make in their lives every day. And if you’re disengaged, the positive difference that they got into teaching to make can then become a negative one.

I have been speaking with teachers about the concept of being disengaged, and the truly reflective ones can see where they have begun this transformation as well. I wholeheartedly believe that all of them can see it, some of them are just more willing to admit it than others. Noticing these parts of oneself is the first step to changing them. We have also been working on a “Back to Basics” initiative in our district. We have been trying to re-engage teachers with activities to help them remember why they got into teaching to begin with. For example, at the beginning of the year, we had all the teachers participate in a Flipgrid that asked them why they teach. We have also been focusing, in our high school, on personalized PD, not only because it is the right way to allow teachers to learn, but because we want them to remember what it’s like to be curious and love what you learn again. Back to basics.

Counting Your Initiatives

This one is a district/building level issue. I worked with a district recently who said they had five initiatives. When I heard that I thought, “Whoa, only five? Not bad!” But, the fact was that when I expanded those initiatives, there were 53 initiatives within the five overarching initiatives that were being implemented. Being adaptable and willing to change is one thing, but people cannot be overloaded and then chastised for not changing with those kinds of crazy expectations. The perception of your ability to change should not be dependent on how willing you are to go with the flow when there is an exorbitant number of things on your plate. District leaders need to be reflective enough of their own expectations to know if what they are asking for is even reasonable.

change 2

Nobody would argue that change is inevitable. In speaking with a colleague the other day, she mentioned how our students, when they are parents, will have a better idea how to work the current technology than most current parents do now just because they grew up with it. The only issue with that is that the technology in 15-20 years is not going to look anything like it does now. Which means, if education professionals are still teaching then, the technology that they’re working with isn’t going to be nearly the same. We can’t focus on technology when we are focusing on change. We need to focus on the ability to accept and grow with change. The ability to work with the changing technology, with that mindset, will come.

Climate · Culture · leadership · Mandy Froehlich · professional development · reflections · Trust

In Pursuit of Change

I am in my sixth district in 12 years. There have been various reasons as to why I’ve left my positions over the years. I’ve been laid off due to budget cuts and limited-term contracts. I’ve left due to changing position types and my determination to get to the job I currently hold. While some people have told me that I’m flat out crazy for moving districts so often (although some of the moves were not intentional), I have learned a great deal from being in so many different places and working for and with various people of differing strengths and abilities. I’ve been given a fairly accurate radar of what is “normal” for a district and what is specific to that environment.

We have a ton of new teachers in our district this year. Overall, at least in Wisconsin, there is a major teacher and administrator shortage, and people are bailing from districts because they feel the grass is greener somewhere else. In some cases, this might be true, but in my experience, every district has it’s own set of special challenges. The question I always have about leaving a district is: how do you know the line between when your job is to create change in a difficult situation and that of your beliefs about education being so fundamentally different from others that it’s time to go?

One of the things I’ve realized over the last few years is that my passion for education includes a strong desire to create change. Systemic change. The kind of change that shifts an entire mindset and experience. I’ve also realized that people like me, and I’ve come to know so many amazing change agents over the last few years, are often seen as boat rockers. We are the ones to push the envelope, challenge others when we feel like what is being done isn’t best for students, hold fast to our fundamental beliefs about learning and relationships. Some people around us don’t like that, and it takes a change agent with a secure confidence in their beliefs to hold fast when other people feel threatened because you’re rocking their boat so hard it might sink. It’s a delicate balance which includes playing the political game of education, being savvy enough to pick your battles, and being able to recognize when change is necessary and when you’re just pushing for change for change sake.

Nobody can argue with the fact that change is hard, especially when you’re looking at systemic changes like wide-spread innovative teaching and learning or greater opportunities for student empowerment. If you’re looking at changes that take time, like a lack of trust or a toxic climate & culture, change can be especially daunting, especially if the people who need the most change don’t recognize that they do. The more of these kinds of people in a district, the more you might question whether your beliefs in education might be so fundamentally different from others that you can’t function to your full capacity in that environment. And there might be times when this is true, but more often than not I wholeheartedly believe that great change takes perseverance, and people who have the tenacity to create change rarely have an easy time doing it, nor do they typically see the fruits of their labors.

change

Being an agent for change is more about recognizing the small wins in failure than it is about winning the battle. It’s not about seeing quick results or even being liked by everyone all the time. It’s about patience and determination and grit and sustaining your beliefs when everyone else tells you they only sound good in theory. It’s about seeing the big picture while searching for little, quick wins that will move the system forward toward the change you want to see. And when you most disagree with the people around you, it’s about recognizing that if everyone were like you, we wouldn’t need change agents.

Recently, I had the experience of realizing that a change being implemented for teachers was a result of all of my incessant preaching about empowering all learners and modeling opportunities for personalized professional development for teachers. I’m not going to lie…this realization came at a difficult time when professionally there had been several frustrations thrown at me at once and I was beginning to second-guess whether some of my core beliefs were really just pipe dreams. I had even used the analogy to a friend of mine that I felt like I was taking one step forward and two steps back, and behind me was a cliff. If I kept going, I’d just fall off. It had been a small win in the grand scheme of changes I’d like to see, but it was a win nonetheless at a time when I needed to see that I was making any difference at all. At a time when I was walking that line, this small change reminded me that my tendency to be relentless in my pursuits was given to me for a good reason.

There will always be appropriate times when a change is needed for yourself and your own professional goals or sanity, and one day that time will come for me as well. Maybe I’ll have made the changes I want to see and it’s time to move on, maybe another opportunity will present itself where I feel like I could affect learning for a greater population, or maybe I’ll be toeing the line and for whatever reason I no longer have the opportunity to create the changes I think are necessary to improve student learning. For now, I’m going to take my small, quick win, and get back to work.

 

 

leadership · Mandy Froehlich · PLN · professional development · reflections · relationships · Uncategorized

New Beginnings: Five Reminders For Leaders

I don’t typically make New Year’s Resolutions because I feel reflection and change should be fluid, not fixed to a certain date or time, but going into a new school is a time for new beginnings. Within this time of busyness and change, it’s imperative to take time to mindfully focus on certain things that keep us leading the way we would want to be lead.

Remember your teacher’s heart.

You were once a teacher, focusing on all the changes and new initiatives and new classrooms and new kids…returning to school at the beginning of a school year is overwhelming and exciting all at the same time. Don’t forget what it was like to reconnect with colleagues that you haven’t seen over the summer, and anticipate viewing your class lists for the first time. It’s easy to get bogged down by budgets  and making tough decisions that not everyone understands, but when it comes down to it, the people you support and the kids are why you’re there. It’s why you became a teacher in the first place. Don’t forget that.

There is always a place for fun.

dance

Like Ren McCormack says in Footloose, “A time to laugh… and a time to weep. A time to mourn… and there is a time to dance… See, this is our time to dance. It is our way of celebrating life. It’s the way it was in the beginning. It’s the way it’s always been. It’s the way it should be now.” There is a time for professional development, training, and planning, but there also needs to be a time for fun. Never underestimate the power of laughter to connect people. So many deep connections can be made by getting to know people on a personal level, and the best way to do that is to give them time to interact in a non-threatening way where they can relax and enjoy themselves. Build bonds. Like each other.

Your PLN is your best asset. Cultivate it.

My PLN, which includes the teachers in my district, are the people that support, challenge and give me the best ideas. As I’ve said a hundred times, I am only as good as the people I surround myself with. Every single day I am amazed with the people that I have had the good fortune to connect with, and I am a better person and leader because of it. I need to be aware, however, that it’s important for me to give back to my PLN as well. I try to do this by being available if they need support, working on projects together, even if we are states away, tweeting ideas I find, and frankly, keeping this blog. If I’m not giving back what I’m getting, I’m not being a very good PLN member.

Model what you want to see.

All. The. Time.

We ask teachers to do this with their students. Model the behavior you want to see. If you want the students reading, you should read as well. If you want them journaling, you should keep a journal, too. Yet, sometimes we don’t put enough focus on leaders modeling what they want to see from teachers. If you want teachers tweeting, you better be on Twitter. If you want teachers integrating tech into their lessons, you better be integrating tech into their PD. Think they should be learning a new tool once a week? Then ask yourself what tool you’ve learned more about this week. There is nothing that will ruin a relationship faster than the “do as I say not as I do” mentality. If you’re afraid of a teacher asking you to show them an example of yours that you’ve asked them to do because you haven’t actually done it, that’s a problem. So, listen like you want to be listened to. Support others the way you want to be supported. Treat others they way you’d like to be treated.

Decide on the climate & culture you want to create.

I really do believe that we have the power, every one of us, from teachers and students to administrators, to create or change the climate and culture. There really are some simple truths when it comes to this. There must be trust amongst all people. They need to feel valued and that what they do actually means something. People desire positivity but are more likely to gravitate toward the negative, so what can we do about that? The amazing part of being a reflective professional is that we have the power every day to decide what kind of climate and culture we want to create in our offices, buildings and district. If we make the changes in ourselves, people will follow suit.

It’s so easy to get lost in both the craziness of the beginning of the year and then the subsequent tedium of day to day, that it’s especially important to be mindful of our objectives and goals, and purposeful in the way that we plan, implement, and interact with others so we are supporting people in the best way we can. Many of us have had the opportunity to work with leaders that we do not want to emulate. Lets decide on the leaders we want to be, and then actually be those people every day.

leadership · Mandy Froehlich · professional development · reflections · Uncategorized

Unmotivated vs Lazy? Re-engaging teachers in their profession

I was scrolling through the Twitters yesterday, and found this tweet by Tom Loud:

Screen Shot 2017-07-17 at 5.45.12 AM

I love discussing climate and culture because they really can be either detrimental to a school, or on the flip side, make it the supportive, engaging place of learning and innovation that we all strive for. In reading Tom’s tweet, I believe he is saying that when administration allows teachers to be lax on their professionalism, it can cause a negative effect on the culture (and I’d argue the climate as well). If I’m right in my thinking, I totally agree. When professional decisions are determined by “what is easier for me” over “what is best for students and their learning”, it causes a rift between teachers who are working diligently to support students the best way they can and the ones seen as protecting their own personal-professional interests. Working for students looks much different than working for oneself.

The part I would tweak in the tweet is the use of the word lazy. I believe that word choice can send a powerful message, and in this case, I would change lazy to unmotivated. I feel like lazy implies a fixed quality that can’t be changed, while unmotivated implies that one COULD be motivated if the right motivator was found. When I look at the teachers who would fall into this category, I mostly (and there are exceptions to every rule) find teachers who are not inherently lazy, but instead people who are disengaged from their professions. They’ve forgotten why they became teachers to begin with, and focus more on compliance and the students who are misbehaving “on purpose” to just to annoy them. I feel like the question here isn’t how admin can force feed motivation into “lazy” teachers, but rather how can we re-engage teachers into their profession so they are the relationship-building, student empowering, collaborative colleagues that would remove the unmotivated label they’ve been given. What support do they need to become the teachers everyone wants to work with?

motivation

We preach student engagement and empowerment. We work toward students taking ownership of their learning, we attempt to teach to the whole child, and we want them to WANT to come to school. We say we’ve taken the creativity out of school, we are teaching to tests, and we focus on facts. We don’t give enough time for things like passion projects or allow students to not only find what they’re good at but what actually makes them happy. Ironically, we do this same thing to teachers, but then we expect teachers to teach the opposite way from what is modeled for them. How powerful it would be if we could relax on the compliance measures for teachers and give them the opportunity to grow as professionals in the way that they want to, give them learning opportunities where they take ownership of their teaching and learning, give them freedom to be creative in their classroom again, and eventually be happy and look forward to coming to work. For some teachers, they have already done this, sometimes in spite of compliance measures, working innovatively even with the constraints put on them. However, some teachers, just like some students, are going to need additional assistance in finding their voice and being re-engaged in their profession. They need to take ownership, they need to focus on true self reflection, but they also need support. I would prefer to think of them as having the ability to be motivated, and then work towards a goal like that. A school of professionally driven educators engaged in their profession could have a significantly positive impact on climate and culture.

 

motivation-quotes-justknow-me

 

Guest Blogger · Mandy Froehlich · professional development · reflections · relationships

The Heart of Connections: Creating relationships outside the classroom

Being on vacation but still desiring to keep up with my blog, I asked my good friend and colleague, Renee Reszel, to provide a guest post. She is the fantastic Library Media Specialist in our district. I worked with Renee when I was a Technology Integrationist and she was a 5th grade teacher, and her greatest strength is making connections with students and providing her class with a family/home like atmosphere. Special thanks to Renee for writing this post!

The Heart of Connections: Creating relationships outside the classroom

Sitting at lunch the last day of school and my mind is still on teacher mode. My mind is always going in different directions on how we can get teachers to “love” or at least “like” professional development. So, at lunch I decided to throw a random idea out to my Mandy. I began by telling her that I went to watch some of our track high school students after school a few times. It was great to see so many of our students engaging in conversations, cheering other athletes on, and competing against other students from our conference. As I watch many events take place, I was greeted by many of them. They even thanked me for coming. Being a new teacher in the district, this made me feel happy that they even noticed I was there and took the opportunity to talk to me.

On the way home I began to think that maybe, just maybe, we should encourage other teachers to attend events of their students whether it is a choir concert, sports event, FBLA competition, or whatever it may be. I feel the big idea right now is to create relationships with your students – what a great way to do it. See them in another area they really excel in. This could also help teachers to understand their students more…why homework may not be getting done, who they are friends with, and more. A professional development that everyone could enjoy and learn from.

As I kept thinking about this idea, I remembered when I taught in El Paso, Texas. I taught at a school that was 99% Hispanic and right on the border of the United States and Mexico. Our students really wanted to learn and get a good education for their future goals. During this teaching experience, relationship building was very, very important. One way we decided to do this was by helping our own families. During our annual food drive during the holiday season, we would choose 20 of our most needy families and deliver bags of food and a turkey to them. The teachers of our school would donate the turkeys. This experience really opened up my eyes to the children I was teaching day after day. Being invited into their homes was something I wish everyone would experience as teachers.. I realized that the students needed family time after school…They needed time to help/babysit their younger brothers and sisters…They had to cook dinner…They had to help Grandma and Grandpa and mom and dad…They had to clean the house… and soooooo much more. This is when I decided to say “getting to know your students outside the classroom is VERY important. I also said:: No more homework. I decided that school was their job and they didn’t need to take it home with them. If they chose to continue learning at home, that was their choice. And let me tell you, there were many that chose to do it on their own. They would share it with me the next day at school. (By the way, we were a Blue Ribbon School and our state test scores we always in the high 90% range.)

I could keep going on about creating relationships with your students like have a Morning Meeting time to get to know them and what they do after school/on weekends; who they hang around with; where their favorite place to eat is; what extracurricular activities they are involved in; and so much more. Another way to do this due to time is greeting them at the door each morning and having a quick “Good Morning” and a special handshake. This quick activity can really tell you a lot of how your day is going to go 🙂

But with this all being said, I feel we need to get to know our students outside of the classroom to produce better learners each day. Get to know them and give them a chance to get to know you regardless if it is a required PD or not.

Renee Reszel

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leadership · Mandy Froehlich · professional development · reflections · relationships

Save the Teachers

I have had some of the most wonderful bosses on the planet. People that are truly still my mentors and friends, some of the first people I go to with both personal and professional issues, and who have consistently made me feel valued and appreciated. These people have never turned away from a question or a problem, never abandoned me when I’ve needed them, and who have always had encouraging words for me, even when I’m probably, no doubt, being a little overdramatic and ridiculous. Many of them have made me a better leader, but more importantly have made me a better person because they have shown me that I’m valuable and what I do and say matters.

And as with every position and every profession, I have had experiences where the leadership has felt (and have said) that everyone is replaceable. Now, I understand that most of the time, a position can be filled. But does that really mean that the people who have filled it in the past are disposable? What kind of message do we send about how the district values relationships if we don’t value the work that people are doing?

From a practical standpoint, the pot from which to choose our future teachers is becoming thinner. When I applied for teaching jobs when I first entered education, the market was flooded with wanna-be educators. There were consistently, easily 700-800 applicants for every teaching position. Regardless of what you believe to be the reason, the fact is that the colleges are turning out less graduates in teaching. The sheer number of teachers is declining, which means less applicants, and less of a chance to fill a position with a quality candidate.

From the position of a school district, it is expensive to hire and consistently retrain teachers. In my current district, our teachers go through additional paid training in the “Ripon Way” for three years after they are hired regardless of if they are new to the profession or not. We need to provide training in technology expectations and use, training & PD in literacy, math, Project Lead the Way, Project-Based Learning, standards based grading, personalized learning, continuous improvement…and the list goes on. Also, hiring new teachers is disruptive to the climate and culture of both the building and teams. While sometimes this disruption is a welcome change, sometimes it might be that the person who left had strengths that others relied upon to keep moving forward.

And then there’s from the perspective of just being, I don’t know, a human.

One of my favorite quotes has always been

angelou

When people feel they are replaceable, it makes it seem like nothing they did or do mattered. No matter how hard they tried, someone else could do their job just as well. What a terrible feeling to live with, because the truth is, while a job can be refilled, nobody is truly replaceable. The job teachers do every day is too important to even allow them to think for one second that they could leave tomorrow and nobody would notice. With every change, whether it’s for the best or not, there is a shift in the dynamic of a building or team. There are kids who will miss that teacher for various reasons, either they made a connection at some point or even just taught their favorite content. I feel like the attitude that people are replaceable is the ultimate symptom of a climate that is toxic. For the person who feels this way, they have ceased to notice the individual ways that people are valuable and the specific strengths that people bring to the table. For the employees made to feel like they are replaceable…what a horrible feeling to go to work with every day, especially in a profession where we have little people (and tall people who are still little people inside) watching our every move and listening to our every word, and everything we do matters. I have worked with people who have left and I haven’t felt bad, but that isn’t because they could be replaced, but rather that they had found a better fit opportunity. I have also worked with people who have left who are an absolute loss to the district and its students and their fellow teachers.

I often look at situations and think about how I would feel if someone treated my child in a particular way. I can say with some certainty that if someone made one of my children feel like they were replaceable, momma bear would come out so quickly that one might actually miss the transformation. This case fits the Angelou quote exactly…they may forget what you said and did, but the feeling of not being valued, that’s not something that will ever be forgotten.

This is one of those cases where true reflection is necessary because this is a major climate/culture issue. Do we value our fellow colleagues, or do we just look at the bottom line when they leave? When we get a resignation letter, do we think, “Shoot, I hate interviewing” or do we first conjure the individual strengths and recognize what a loss that person will be? Are we retaining our staff by creating an atmosphere where their professionalism and individuality is explicitly valued and celebrated? If we are not, the personal and professional toll on our employees is costing so much more than the monetary cost of replacement to the district.

growth mindset · innovation · leadership · Mandy Froehlich · professional development · reflections · relationships

Sit Down You’re Rocking the Boat

If I could choose one of my goals in which I was guaranteed to make happen prior to leaving education, it would be to create leaders who are engaged in their profession, energized to create meaningful change, and are willing to spend more time outside their comfort zones. I want people to love their jobs. I want them to make the people around them love their jobs. Students are watching our EVERY MOVE. If we model our love for learning and education, the students will most likely follow suit.

To me, to support teacher leaders in reaching the level where they feel this way about their profession and working with kids would be the ultimate accomplishment. Ideally,maslows-hierarchy-of-needs every education professional should have the potential and motivation to do just this, but I honestly think that there is a hierarchy of needs that needs to be met to reach professional “actualization”. We often talk about Maslow’s Hierarchy of needs when looking at students and why or why not they might be successful in their learning, but I think that when you look at adults and their professional lives, a similar case could be made.

So, for example, if a teacher struggles with belonging in their grade level team, how does that affect their ability to try something new or think innovatively? When you spend so much of your time outside your comfort level just by being with the people that you work closely with, are you willing to push outside your comfort zone in other areas?

Another example: if potential leaders don’t feel like their jobs are secure or they don’t feel safe in their jobs for various reasons, how much can we expect that they are willing to become engaged in their profession, energized to create meaningful change, and willing to spend more time outside their comfort zones? There are many reasons that teachers might not feel safe (physically, mentally, and emotionally) even though that might sound ridiculous at a school. I worked in a school where some students with behavior issues were becoming violent, and teachers and paraprofessionals were being bruised and injured by students on a regular basis. The anxiety of being injured by an angry student could affect the feeling of being safe, and I’m positive that this is not a specific incidence, but instead more commonplace than the public would even believe.

I’ve also been involved in situations where employees are nervous for their jobs for various reasons that might or might not have to truly do with their performance (political, cultural, budget cuts, errant leadership). If any employee doesn’t feel like their positions are safe, or they feel like they could be “fired” for trying something new, they will be less likely to rock the boat. Unfortunately, this is exactly what we want these leaders to do, whether they reside in administration roles or teacher roles. We WANT them rocking the boat, thinking innovatively, pushing others to do the same. Yet, if they don’t feel safe to try new ideas, don’t feel safe to fail because their jobs are on the line, they will be less likely to do these things.

Many issues that can stop a potential leader from moving forward and reaching a level of professionalism that would keep them fulfilled and provide them with opportunities to create real change reside within issues in the climate and culture of the district. Realistically, shifts in climate and culture need to happen in order to truly give everyone this chance, but while they are happening and everyone is shifting into the new normal, here’s my question:

How can you create much-needed change in a classroom or district when in order to stay safe you feel you need to maintain the status quo, but to create the change you need to rock the boat?

I’m not actually sure I have the answer to this. So many times I feel districts are wrapped up in every new initiative that they subscribe to, that they forget to go back to the basics. (climate, culture, mindset, effective leadership, embedded support). They forget that every teacher, like every student, has different needs and personalities, and in order to bring them up to being the professionals that they desire to be, we need to give them the support they need to not only function, but then excel as well. So, what can a professional do to move forward when their basic needs aren’t being met? Is there a way to recognize those needs and get them met even if the source is external? As a district administrator, how can I find these needs and support the staff to create the leaders that rock the boat? And how do I find and support the teachers who have been told to sit down so often, that they don’t remember what it’s like to stand up?

gates